Tag Archives: cia

The UN and 250,000 Dead Somalis

The UN has announced that in 2010-2012, including the Great Horn of Africa Drought period, at least 250,000 Somalis starved to death.

Most of those who died from starvation were internally displaced persons, displaced in the main by the military invasion and occupation of southern Somalia by the UN backed Ethiopian Army and then the AU “peacekeepers”, today some 25,000 strong.

When I last wrote about starvation in Somalia I spoke of the UN budgeting 10 cents a day for food aid to feed each Somali refugee. Its called a “budget shortfall” as in “we want to help but we just don’t have the money”.

Yet during this period of mass starvation of the Somali people the UN and its western overlords spent over $1 billion funding its military “peacekeeping mission” in what’s left of the country.

$1 billion for war and 250,000 Somalis left to starve to death?

Maybe knowing that the head of the largest UN food aid “ngo” in Somalia, UNICEF, is Anthony “Tony” Lake, formerly National Security Advisor of the USA and once nominated to be Director of the CIA can help one understand why this happened.

Tony Lake is the one who so infamously stated he “regretted” not doing anything while knowing full well mass murder was going on in Rwanda on his watch as Bill Clinton’s right hand man in 1994. CIA to UNICEF? Should one be suprised to find mass starvation under his watch in Somalia?

Today, while the propaganda machines in the western media speak of “peace and democracy coming to Somalia for the first time in a generation” they some how forget how Somalis themselves brought peace to Mogadishu in 2006 only to see the UN backed Ethiopian invasion send it all up in smoke.

The television news channels may trot out a few tame Somalis to spout rhetoric about “Somalis running the show” behind the cameras stand “peacekeepers” armed to the teeth by the UN backed by the banktatorships in the west.

The fact is no power no matter how strong can bring peace to Somalia from without, only the Somali people, left alone to sort out their own problems can do so. In 2006 the Union of Islamic Courts succeeded for the first time in 15 years to no avail due to armed intervention ordered by the USA and its minions in the UN. This externally funded and directed armed conflict continues to drive hundreds of thousands of Somalis from their land and homes leaving them to starve on the UN’s bounty of 10 cents a day.

And all the while more arms pour into Somalia from the west with Pax Americana demanding that any and all paper restrictions on such be lifted, all in the name of the “war on terror”, really a “war of terror”, a war on the Somali people whose main misfortune turns out to be that they live smack in the middle of the Horn of Africa astride the “Gate of Tears”, Baab Al Mandeb, where the Indian Ocean meets the Red Sea through which the largest economies in the world depend on to ship their goods.

Writing about the enormous, inhuman crimes committed by the UN in the Horn of Africa has become almost to painful to continue to do. But when the UN sends its talking heads to tell the world that a quarter million more Somalis died these past two years, died by mass starvation what choice does one have but to once again raise a voice in protest for turning your head away from the television and pretending not to hear is simply not a decision I for one can live with.

Thomas C. Mountain is the most widely distributed independent journalist in Africa, living and reporting from Eritrea since 2006. He can be reached at thomascmountain_at_yahoo_dot_com.

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Ghost money bribes – what the British govt has in store for Somalia

The below article, posted today on The Guardian website, reveals that so-called British democracy and diplomacy boil down to little more than money stuffed in to suitcases and handed over to local actors to serve British interests.

Clearly British foreign policy takes the shape of an imperialist divide and rule strategy that takes no regard for a country’s self-determination.

In The Guardian article, “Ghost money” refers to the MI6 (and CIA) regular large cash payments to Hamid Karzai’s office with the aim of maintaining access to the Afghan leader and his top allies and officials.

The British payments have also been designed to bolster UK influence in Kabul, in what a source described as “an auction with each country trying to outbid the other” in the course of an often fraught relationship with the Karzai government.

This is what Britain has in store for its intervention in Somalia – bribes and backhanders which stoke existing sectarian tensions to deliver to the door of imperialism. Britain will exploit and cause further chaos in order to get access to Somalia’s resources for its own financial capitalist markets.

This is what we must work to expose. The British government clearly can play no progressive role in the development, democracy and liberation of Somalia.

A solid and real Somali state is a threat to imperialism, and that is why Britain will always seeks to undermine democracy and enable corruption.

If you agree – and support this sentimentjoin us to protest outside the British governments conference on Somalia on 7 May at Lancaster House in London.

Hands off Somalia

CIA and MI6 ghost money may fuel Afghan corruption, say diplomats

Failure of peace initiatives raises questions over whether British eagerness for political settlement may have been exploited
Hamid Karzai with the Finnish prime minister, Jyrki Katainen, in Helsinki. Photograph: Lehtikuva/Reuters
The CIA and MI6 have regularly given large cash payments to Hamid Karzai’s office with the aim of maintaining access to the Afghan leader and his top allies and officials, but the attempt to buy influence has largely failed and may have backfired, former diplomats and policy analysts say.

The Guardian understands that the payments by British intelligence were on a smaller scale than the CIA’s cash handouts, reported in the New York Times to have been in the tens of millions, and much of the British money has gone towards attempts to finance peace initiatives, which have so far proved abortive.

That failure has raised questions among some British officials over whether British eagerness to promote a political settlement may have been exploited by Afghan officials and self-styled intermediaries for the Taliban alike.

Responding to the allegations while on a visit to Helsinki on Monday, Karzai said his national security council (NSC) had received support from the US government for the past 10 years, and the amounts involved were “not big” and were used for a variety of purposes including helping those wounded in the conflict.

“It’s multi-purpose assistance,” he said, without commenting on the allegations that the money was fuelling corruption.

Kabul sources told the Guardian that the key official involved in distributing the payments within the NSC was Ibrahim Spinzada, a close confidant of the president known as Engineer Ibrahim. There is, however, no evidence that Spinzada personally gained from the cash payments or that in distributing them among the president’s allies and sometimes his foes he was breaking Afghan law.

Officials say the payments, referred to in the New York Times report as “ghost money”, helped prop up warlords and corrupt officials, deepening Afghan popular mistrust of the Kabul government and its foreign backers, and thereby helped drive the insurgency.

The CIA money has sometimes caused divisions between the various branches of US government represented in Kabul, according to diplomats stationed in Kabul, particularly when it helped give the CIA chief of station in Kabul direct access to Karzai without the US ambassador’s knowledge or approval.

One former Afghan budgetary official told the Guardian: “On paper there was very little money that went to the National Directorate of Security [NDS, the Afghan intelligence service], but we knew they were taken care of separately by the CIA.

“The thing about US money is a lot of it goes outside the budget, directly through individuals and companies, and that opens the way for corruption.”

Khalil Roman, who served as Karzai’s deputy chief of staff from 2002 until 2005, told the New York Times: “We called it ‘ghost money’. It came in secret, and it left in secret.”

“The biggest source of corruption in Afghanistan,” one American official told the newspaper, “was the United States.”

Sources said the MI6 aid was on a smaller scale, and much of it was focused on trying to promote meetings between Karzai’s government and Taliban intermediaries, as was embarrassingly the case in 2010 when a recipient of a thousand of pounds of MI6 money turned out not to be the Taliban leader he claimed to be, but an impostor from the Pakistani city of Quetta.

The British payments have also been designed to bolster UK influence in Kabul, in what a source described as “an auction with each country trying to outbid the other” in the course of an often fraught relationship with the Karzai government.

Vali Nasr, a former US government adviser on Afghanistan said: “Karzai has been lashing out against American officials and generals, so if indeed there has been funding by the CIA, you have to ask to what effect has that money been paid. It hasn’t clearly has brought the sort of influence it was meant to.”

Nasr, now dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and author of a new book criticising US policy in Afghanistan, The Dispensable Nation, said: “If the terms of such payments are not clear, the question is how well to they tag with US policy … The CIA has a narrow, counter-terrorism purview that involved working with warlords, but that is quite a different agenda, on how we conduct the war or how we build a government.”

The CIA has also been heavily criticised for conducting drone attacks against suspected militants over the border in Pakistan and for calling in air strikes inside Afghanistan while on joint operations with NDS units, which led to civilian casualties.

A report on Monday by the Afghanistan Analysts Network, a thinktank in Kabul, said the latest such NDS-CIA operation, in Kunar province on 13 April, caused the deaths of 17 civilians.

Kate Clark, one of the network’s analysts, said: “It is one thing to conduct covert operations in a hostile country. I’m flabbergasted that the CIA is running these kind of covert operations in a friendly country. It runs counter to accountability, democracy and the rule of law, and damaging what the US is trying to do. The CIA puts certain things as a priority – whether someone is against al-Qaida, for example – and damn the rest.”

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